2021 Eligibility Post

Well, that was quick. 2021 is almost at an end.  Time doesn’t just fly, it does so at a steadily increasing relative velocity. It wasn’t a super productive year for me, but it was full of great opportunities and it was busier than last year when I published a grand total of 0 stories. This year, I published 2 new stories and I’m working on a lot of stuff for next year and beyond 2022.

If you’re catching up on work for awards, or just looking for cool stories to read I’ve created this post for you. Just for you. It has links to the stories I published this year, some extra (relevant) information about them and what they are (probably) eligible for, if you’re so inclined. Here you go.

An Arc of Electric Skin” – Published in Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine, September 2021

  • A roadside mechanic in Lagos walks into a researcher’s office one day and volunteers to undergo an experimental procedure that will increase the conductivity of his skin several orders of magnitude. As the researcher prepares him for the procedure, she becomes emotionally involved with him and learns the tragic reason why he chose to undergo such a process.  
  • Genre indicators: Science fiction, africanfuturism, social sci-fi, political fiction
  • Word count: 2965 (Short Story category)
  • Reviewer highlights: Must-Read Speculative Short Fiction: September 2021 in Tor.com, Recommended in Locus Magazine and in SFRevu.
  • Eligible For: BSFA, Hugo, Nebula, Nommo, Asimovs Readers Award, Ignyte, Eugie Award, Locus, Theodore Sturgeon Award (and others)

Note: if you want to review/read this story and can’t afford or can’t access an issue of Asimov’s, please reach out to me in the comments or by email.

Comments on Your Provisional Patent Application for An Eternal Spirit Core” – Published in Clarkesworld Magazine, March 2021

  • A man’s brother leaves comments on a shared online document for patent application as he reviews it, and he becomes increasingly alarmed at what the document proposes – a new consciousness-recording technology with a personal loss as its root.
  • Genre indicators: Science fiction, africanfuturism, afrofuturism, transhumanism, postcyberpunk
  • Word count: 1125 (Short Story category)
  • Reviewer Highlights: Must-Read Speculative Short Fiction: March 2021 in Tor.com, Quick Sip Reviews
  • Eligible For: BSFA, Hugo, Nebula, Nommo, Ignyte, Eugie Award, Locus, Theodore Sturgeon Award (and others)

Alright, that’s it.

On a related note, I’m also catching up on reading of my own and will (probably) have my usual favourite African SFF up by early next year – ideally January.

Take it easy.

My Favorite African Science Fiction and Fantasy Short Fiction of 2020

***

2020 started out dangerously for me. A volcano erupted near Manila just as I was flying into the city to transit back to Kuala Lumpur and we all watched with concern as the pilot had to dodge the dust and volcanic ash cloud to get us into the city. Exciting. Or not. We were the last flight to land before the airport was shut down for 3 days for safety so we were stuck there. It was a mess. One could say it was an omen of what was to come because what followed that in quick succession within the first few weeks of the year was political turmoil, an oil price crash, and then the pandemic and all that followed it.

What a difference a year makes.

Despite all that though, some good things did happen and I look forward to 2021 with cautious optimism that things will get better by the end of it.

Although I didn’t have any new stories published in 2020 (I was just far too busy with personal life and work and research and other things) I did sow the seeds of things that could/should pay off in the future, especially for my writing. I signed with the excellent Van Aggellen African Literary Agency and edited a book I’m quite proud of – Africanfuturism: An Anthology with the good folks at Brittlepaper and it includes stories by some excellent authors: Nnedi Okorafor, TL Huchu, Dilman Dila, Rafeeat Aliyu, Tlotlo Tsamaase, Mame Bougouma Diene, Mazi Nwonwu, and Derek Lubangakene. Its gotten (two!) great reviews from Locus and I personally think it contains some of the best African SF stories of the year. I suppose that makes me eligible for best editor (Short Form) for the Hugo awards and stuff so that’s nice. It is available for free download and you can also read the individual stories online.

Africanfuturism: An Anthology is just one of several places to find excellent African SFF in 2020. There was a lot to choose from. If you want a working list of (almost) everything that came out last year, check out THIS link. (I’d also like to encourage you to please fill this form with any works that might have been missed out, it is growing increasingly difficult to keep up with everything published – which is a good problem to have – but with constraints on my time tightening, its also a problem that’s getting worse). This gives us all plenty of material to be considered for this year’s Nommo awards. Especially in the short fiction category which I have repeated multiple times is the category I enjoy writing, reading and keeping up with most because I basically grew up on SF short fiction – Asimov’s Hugo winners collections and Dozois’s Years Best SF kept me tethered to the field even when I went through the valley of the shadow of my SF reading-death. So as it is now a tradition of sorts, I’d like to highlight the African speculative fiction short stories I read and enjoyed most from the wildly disruptive year gone by.  

[Before we begin, as always, a few notes: these are my personal favorites or those that left a lasting impression on me based on my own tastes. They are largely stories I’d personally recommend. Also, while I’ve read a lot of the African SFF short work put out this year, I’m sure I haven’t read everything. I am also really restricting myself to just 10 in this list, as difficult as that is, unlike in previous years where I would use ties to sneak more works in by pairing them with others that are thematically similar. And finally, I usually don’t include my own stories published that year for obvious bias and while Africanfuturism: An Anthology easily contains many of my favorite stories of the year, given how involved I was in shaping those stories, I have decided not to include any of them on this list. So without further ado, here are my 10 favorite African speculative fiction short stories of 2020, in no particular order.]

***

1. “Things Boys Do” by Pemi Aguda (Nigeria), Nightmare Magazine

I’ve read and loved Pemi’s writing for almost a decade and she’s only getting better. If you’ve never read her work before, she is consistently brilliant at crafting unsettling, weird and very Nigerian stories. I call them Nigerian Gothic. In this particular story, 3 men have new sons of their own but these births don’t bring them joy, only… wrongness. Slowly, their stories converge on each other and on an incident from the past. This is a perfectly constructed story designed by a master craftswoman. Definitely one of my favorite stories of the year, much like her previous story “Manifest“, which if you haven’t read, you really should. (I still think it was a crime that it didn’t make the 2019 Nommo Awards shortlist). Highly Recommended. 

2. “And This is How to Stay Alive” by Shingai Njeri Kagunda (Kenya), Fantasy Magazine

This story opens with a shocking suicide and then, through alternating perspectives and the plot device of a mystic potion, constructs a fascinating portrait of sibling love, grief, acceptance, and second chances. I particularly enjoyed the way this story plays with the concept of time and uses it to get at the heart of a family tragedy. Its written with consideration and compassion and is very effecting. Recommended.

3. “The Bend Of Water” by Tiah Marie Beautement (South Africa), Omenana Magazine

Set in a future where Africa was never colonized, an agent for the United African government with latent magical powers is asked to investigate border incursions that have been happening lately. She finds that the incursions are immigrants from the Americas being brought in by a woman with powers of her own, using them to transport refugees across the oceans in a sort of rocket bubble. The two women engage and in so doing, learn about and change each other fundamentally. Tiah has a gift for writing strange and believable romances and this is no exception, Its a standout story in a great issue of Omenana with many good stories that just missed this list and I highly recommend it.

4. “The ThoughtBox” by Tlotlo Tsamaase (Botswana), Clarkesworld Magazine

The story of a woman in an abusive relationship whose boyfriend brings home a device that records and displays their thoughts to one another supposedly to help them communicate better, but of course all is not as it seems. Tlotlo was very prolific in 2020 with stories that seem to share themes. Young female protagonists struggling with identity, sex, relationships and corporate careers in various nightmare scenarios. I like The River of Night, and I edited Behind Our Irises which is wonderful but not in consideration for this list, so I will happily recommend this story which I really enjoyed and which may be the best example of balancing all the recurring themes so that they converge into a truly fascinating, creepy story with a great twist at the end. Recommended.

5. “Rat and Finch Are Friends” by Innocent Chizaram Ilo (Nigeria), Strange Horizons

A beautiful of friendship and love about a boy who is an amusu and can transform into a finch. When he meets another amusu boy that can transform into a rat, they become friends, as the title suggests, and more. But that leads to suppression of both their abilities and their relationship from their school, community and family for different reasons, but with the same somewhat sad result. Still the story is hopeful and moving. Recommended.

6. “The Cult of Reminiscence” by Derek Lubangakene (Uganda), Jalada 09: Nostalgia

A bizarre story about a woman who died but was kept in cryo-stasis by her father and is revived later using nanotechnology to physically repair her brain and body but not the information that was contained in it – her memories. So she goes on an odyssey of sorts, to try to remember who she is, meeting a changed world, strange characters, conflicted family members, cults, and other ‘Revivers’. Its a thoughtful story with lots of consideration given to what memory is and how it is processed and viewed. An opening reminiscent of The Matrix definitely doesn’t hurt. I enjoyed reading it. Recommended.

7. “Fairy Tales for Robots by Sofia Samatar (Somalia/USA), Made To Order: Robots and Revolution

This is a story about stories, a story about stories and robots. In it, the protagonist spends one entire night telling classic fairy tales to a robot she has made in the hopes of giving it a kind of personality and in so doing, we learn a few things about the narrator, how she sees herself compared to how the world sees her but also she realizes in each story a metaphor for aspects of robots themselves and the importance of compassion which relates back to the narrators own experience. Samatar has a great grasp of story mechanics and fairy tales and it is all on display here. The story is comprehensive and thoughtful and almost academic and very, very engaging and clever. Highly Recommended.

8. “A Love Song for Herkinal as composed by Ashkernas amid the ruins of New Haven” by Chinelo Onwualu (Nigeria), Uncanny Magazine

This story is set in a sort-of future version of our world where something unexplained has happened and Africa is the only continent left, with all the people of the diaspora magically returned. Also, magic has returned and people have powers. It follows two ex-scammer sisters who now run a hotel, the guests the magical guests they receive and their niece who is coming into her own. It is short but has wonderful worldbuilding which uses many elements of Nigerian folklore and culture in a believable yet fantastical setting which I really enjoy. The prose is authentic and crisp and the story itself is just fun to read. Recommended.

9. “Esmerelda” by Natasha Omokhodion-Banda (Zambia), Doek! 4: Worlds Beyond This One

A humorous tale about a well-to-do Zambian family that purchases a domestic robot to help the lady of the house and the various responses to it. We change points of view – from the robot itself, to the madam of the house herself, to her domestic helper Ba Mutale, constantly getting shifting information and feelings about the role of technology in their lives. Interestingly, its never told from the POV of the man of the house who makes the purchase and in the end, the upgrade that throws things into even more turmoil. In turns funny and revealing, I quite liked this story. Besides, it made me laugh. Recommended.

10. “Convergence in Chorus Architecture” by Dare Segun Falowo (Nigeria), Dominion: An Anthology of Speculative Fiction from Africa and the African Diaspora

Dominion: An Anthology of Speculative Fiction from Africa and the African Diaspora by [Zelda Knight, Marian Denise Moore, Eugen Bacon, Nicole Givens Kurtz, Dilman Dila, Rafeeat Aliyu, Suyi Davies Okungbowa, Michael Boatman, Odida Nyabundi, Ekpeki Oghenechovwe Donald]

This is a brilliantly weird Novelette that merges elements of Yoruba mythology with a kind of cosmic horror sensibility to create something unique, all written in exquisite prose. It follows two children who come to strange town of exiles fleeing war, where they are struck by lightning and see visions before one of them is abducted by strange creatures in ships of bone and the other is taken on a journey by the Orisha to try to save her. That summary barely does the story justice. Strange but full of wonderful elements, its a definite standout. I don’t know if it was Dare’s intent but I interpreted the story as a nightmare-metaphor for the lived experience of the transatlantic slave trade and on that level, in my head anyway, every part of the story works spectacularly. Highly Recommended.

***

My first book ‘Incomplete Solutions’ is now in pre-order

Front cover

Well this is fun.

My collection of stories ‘Incomplete Solutions’ is in pre-order now which means its an actual thing in the world which you can buy right now and read soon. It includes my longest story ever – a novella, brand new stories and some previously published stories. Its heavy on the science fiction, just the way I like it, but there’s some fantasy in there too. Just the way I like it.

Some really cool people (some of whom are favorites of mine) had really flattering things to say about it and I’m still amazed by their words.

Fierce and urgent – a remarkable new voice. Lauren Beukes

These are amazing narratives which show assiduous reflection on science, emotion, mysticism and philosophy. With such careful consideration, impeccable science and interesting characters, each story is prose that gently tickles the forebrain. Recommended.’ Tade Thompson

A wonderfully eclectic showpiece of hard science fiction and fascinating speculation. The stories in this collection will blow your mind.’ Tendai Huchu

Wole Talabi mixes literary skill with speculative SF abilities to make him one of the spearheads of the African revolution in speculative writing.’ Geoff Ryman

You can get a copy here.

So yes, I’m excited. Can you tell? I hope you enjoy reading these stories as much as I’ve enjoyed writing them. And yes, I am already working on my next collection. I have a title ready and everything. It will be called…

 

My Favorite African Science Fiction and Fantasy (AfroSFF) Short Fiction of 2016

Masai Cyborg (Image Credit: Rodrigo Galdino – https://www.artstation.com/artist/rodrigogaldino)

 

I think 2016 has been another good year for African speculative fiction, exploring existence in strange, interesting and wonderful ways.

This year, the African speculative fiction society (ASFS) was launched, the Nommos award for speculative fiction was announced, Nnedi Okorafor (Nigeria/USA) won both the Hugo and Nebula awards for best Novella, Acan Innocent Immaculate (Uganda) won the Writivism Short Story Prize with a science-fantasy story, Lesly Nneka Arimah’s (Nigeria) spec-fic story was nominated for the Caine Prize, Walter Dinjos (Nigeria) won 2nd place in the L Rob Hubbard Writers of the Future contest, Unathi Magubeni and Andrew Miller’s (both of South Africa) novels which are both speculative works were nominated for the Etisalat prize for literature, Omenana is now in its 8th issue, AfroSFv2 (edited by Ivor Hartmann) and African Monsters (edited by Margret Helgadottir and Jo Thomas) both published December 2015 continued to make the rounds and gather good reviews, there are excellent new novels by Sofia Samatar (Somalia/USA), Tade Thompson (Nigeria/UK) and Nick Wood (South Africa), a new collection from Lauren Beukes (South Africa) as well as a slew of Africans featured in top genre magazines and anthologies from Clarkesworld, Strange horizons, Apex, Lightspeed… the list goes on and on. The year also saw the worldwide release of the Imagine Africa 500 anthology edited by Billy Kahora (Kenya) and Published by Shadreck Chikoti (Malawi).

All this activity means there is plenty of material to be considered for the inaugural Nommo awards next year. Which is excellent.

Personally, I am a huge fan of short fiction. I read far more short fiction than I do novels. I also write short fiction myself. And like I mentioned last year, I really like ‘Best-Of’ SF/F short story recommendations and lists. I’ve found some of my all time favorite stories on lists such as these.

So in view of all this activity, and in the interest of fueling discussion and analysis of African speculative fiction stories in general, here are my favorite African speculative fiction short stories of 2016, in no particular order.

***

  1. Ndakusawa” by Blaize Kaye (South Africa), Fantastic Stories of the Imagination 

This amazingly crafted story of love, loss and parenting is a bullet to the heart. At less than a thousand words, it is the shortest story on this list but by far one of my favorites. This is a universal story of a small South African family – a man and his curious, brilliant daughter whose intelligence opens her up to opportunities that keeps putting distance between them physically but not emotionally. In the end, the physical distance becomes incredible, it may be her scientific brilliance that brings them together again. Highly recommended and will be in my nomination list for the Nommos, perhaps even the Hugo.

ndak-700w

I have to say, Blaize Kaye seems to be an expert at crafting short stories with a punch – you should also check out his “Revision Theory” in Nature, and “Return to the Source” in Zetetic.

 

  1. Transit” by Derek Lubangakene (Uganda), Imagine Africa 500  

One of my favorites in this anthology. Set in Kampala, 500 years in the future, this is an action-packed, fast-paced, and unapologetically pulpy high-concept thriller with a well-realized world painted in context. There are no infodumps or ‘as-you-know-bobs’ which some of the other stories suffer from but there is enough for the reader to figure out what is going on and enjoy the ride. In this world, all the men on the continent have been made impotent, and The Hegemony, run by women, controls everything. But when a man finds he has a son, he enlists the help of his mother who used to work for the Hegemony to get the child to a safe place. It features droids, photon guns, molecular displacement teleportation devices and much, much more. The story is so much fun with action on every page and also a lovely twist at the end. I also like that the world in the story isn’t described as a full-tilt dystopia and although there is a protagonist, no one is painted as outright good or evil. Recommended.

imagine-africa-500

 

  1. The Mama Mmiri” by Walter Dinjos (Nigeria), Beneath Ceaseless Skies 

Walter Dinjos, second place winner of the Writers of the Future Contest, delivers this story of a twin seeking revenge against the man who has sacrificed his twin brother to the spirit of a river across which a bridge is being built by foreigners from England. Dinjos does a great job of building up suspense and highlighting how the people of the village are being betrayed by their own for the benefit of the foreigners, something that resonates with the colonial experience. Although the story is linear and the villain comes across as a bit of a caricature, the quality of the writing and the spiritual, emotional, horror, fantasy, colonialism and revenge elements make for a powerful story. Recommended.

 

  1. Dream-Hunter” by Nick Wood (South Africa)Omenana Issue 6

One can always count on doctor of clinical psychology and professional writer Nick Wood to deliver a complex, socially conscious and intense story with powerful, disturbing imagery and still make it an exciting and fun read. In this story, the protagonist is a mixed-race (English father, Zulu Mother) Dream-Hunter with a complicated history, who works for the Justice department in the UK, using technology to enter people’s subconscious in order to find evidence that they committed (or did not commit) a crime. On this particular mission however when he enters the dreams of the brutal killer “Sledgehammer Jones”,  who is accused of killing his wife, our protagonist comes face-to-face with aspects of himself. 

ngibambe-ngesandla-dream-hunter

In the twisted dreams of this man, his past, the very concepts of right and wrong, violence, vengeance, guilt and even justice are interrogated. It’s a brilliant story and immediately I read it in Omenana, I knew it would still be on my list of favorites by years end. Highly recommended and will probably be in my nomination list for the Nommos.

 

  1. Virtual Snapshots” by Tlotlo Tsamaase (Botswana), Terraform 

In this very metaphorical story, set in a future Botswana, extreme environmental damage has made it difficult to live in the real world and so most people put their bodies in a sort of stasis and upload themselves into a virtual existence called digiworld. This keeps their cost of existing down. In order  to walk the actual Earth, one has to pay for everything… clean air, water, UV protection, everything.

capture

The protagonist is a young woman who isn’t really loved by her family and can barely afford to live in digiworld, but is summoned out of digiworld and into the real world when her mother becomes ill. We follow her on this journey and her interactions with her family which are not quite as expected. The story is relentlessly sad and bleak but beautiful and full of wonderful imagery. It may not have a tight plot or a water-tight central conceit but as a metaphor for modern life, societal exploitation, family relations and the struggle of an individual to make one’s way in the world and find a place in family and society, it works brilliantly, mostly because the writing is so poetic and honest. Recommended.

 

  1. One Wit’ This Place” by Muthi Nhlema (Malawi), Imagine Africa 500  

After some sort of war 500 years in the future where the geo-engineers fail to save the world from devastating climate change, a soldier returns home to his wife. He is traumatized, she hides a secret and the earth is changing in terrible ways that affects their lives for the worse. The opening is gripping, the characterization is deft, and the themes – war, love, death, home, climate change, and infidelity – are explored through the interaction between the couple brilliantly. One of the things I loved most about this story was the use of an evolved language – part pidgin, part truncated words (for example the Oce is the Ocean and the Sah is the desert). Of course language in 500 years will be different from the way it is now and it’s done well, so the reader is never lost. The end is tragic but earned and every aspect of the story has an unfortunate beauty to it. Highly recommended.

 

  1. SunDown” by Acan Innocent Immaculate (Uganda), Munyori Literary Journal 

SunDown is a fascinating bit of science-fantasy that tells the story of Red Sun, a young albino boy awaiting the death of the sun in Nakasongola, a remote region of Uganda. It takes place in the year 2050 and some of humanity has already fled the Earth which will surely die with the sun but only the ‘right’ kind of people, “geniuses with perfect genes” were allowed onto space ships to search for a new home. Red Sun, and the others left behind have features that apparently aren’t quite ‘right’. From here the story explores loss, science, religion, abandonment, mortality, and what it means to be human, through Red Sun’s memories and interactions with the others left behind. It’s a thoughtful story that thrives on mood and feeling (no reason is offered for why the sun is dying 5 billion years ahead of schedule or how Earth survived the evaporation of its oceans during the early red giant phase or why it collapses to a black hole when our sun doesn’t have nearly enough mass to ever become a black hole, etc, etc.) But who cares? Red Sun, Nyambura, Askari, The dwarf, these are all great characters, the writing is confident, beautiful, enjoyable and the subject resonates. In that way, it is a bit like Lesly Nneka Arimah’s “What It Means When A Man Falls From The Sky”. ‘SunDown’ won the 2016 Writivism Short Story Prize. Recommended.

 

  1. The Wild Dogs” by Mandisi Nkomo (South Africa), Lights Out: Resurrection 

In this story, a Swedish woman leaves her country and family and volunteers to go to South Africa in order to help fight a strange new disease consuming Cape Town and turning its victims into something horrifying. She arrives and finds out that the place, the disease and the people, are not what she thought they’d be and is forced to come face to face with monstrous inhumanity and her own relationship to it as an outsider. I edited this original story for the collection “Lights Out: Resurrection” and I really enjoyed its pace and its themes on policing, politics, race, poverty, and healthcare. I know an editor is not supposed to have favorites but… forgive me. Of the original stories in the collection, I really, really liked this one most. Recommended.

 

resurrection3

 

  1. Rusties” by Nnedi Okorafor (Nigeria/USA) and Wanuri Kahiu (Kenya), Clarkesworld Magazine

Set in Nairobi after mechanical traffic robots called Rusties have been deployed, the story follows a woman who considers one Rusty in particular, her friend. This friendship, along with the actions of her cheating boyfriend, inadvertently triggers unrest when natural emergence of a kind of sentience among the networked robots, a solar flare and human mistrust of the intelligent machines collide. The story has a big concept, scope and world but a small, intimate focus, on the woman’s relationship with the Rusty. While this means the story has some slabs of infodumping to explain the situation, it also means that the story never gets boring or goes off on a tangent and we keep caring about the narrator through everything. To be honest even the infodumps are quite interesting. The subject of emergence intelligence/sentience is one I really enjoy and is the subject of a story I just finished writing as well so I loved reading this exploration of the concept by two of Africa’s finest creative minds. I think you will too. Recommended.

Fun fact: This story is inspired by the real-life situation in Kinshasa where the government installed giant solar-powered robots designed by Thérèse Izay Kirongozi to control traffic and mitigate their poor urban planning.

xxxxxxxx

 

  1. Screamers” by Tochi Onyebuchi (Nigeria/USA) in Omenana Issue 8

I first read this story when the awesome editors at Omenana, by some fortunate accident, sent it to me instead of an edited version of my own story ‘The Last Lagosian’ which appeared in the same issue. I opened the file, realized it wasn’t my story but kept reading anyway. I literally read the whole story standing in the middle of my kitchen, staring at my phone, unable to stop. This is an incredible story that explores policing, family, anger, art, generational and societal injustice, migration, desensitization, frustration, terrorism and weaponized emotion.

cover-696x854

I won’t even bother summarizing the plot because at its heart the story is not so much about the mechanics of what is happening, but about the way it makes the reader feel. I think the whole story is one big metaphor. The author even seems to allude to this with the story’s opening.

“When Dad talked about the Screamers, I thought maybe he could’ve been a writer. We were different like that. I was never too good at metaphor myself.”

Tochi, unlike his narrator, is very good at metaphor and as far as metaphors go, this is bullseye. I enjoyed this story and I highly recommend it.

***

So that’s it. What were your favorite African speculative stories of 2016?

————————————

Postscripts: Notes and Other Thoughts: –

  1. Of course I didn’t include any of my own stories. That would have been silly. I did however write quite a lot of short fiction in 2016, you can find those HERE, if you like, and make up your own mind about them.
  2. Needless to say (and yet, here it is, being said [written, but you get the point]), this is a personal list, and I certainly don’t think these are the definitive ‘best-of-the-year’ as some clickbaiters would have you believe. These are simply my personal favorites based on my own reading, tastes and what I’d recommend to anyone shopping for African spec fic from 2016 to read/consider.
  3. I have a natural preference for science fiction over fantasy, horror or any of the other speculative sub-genres so this list is probably biased in that direction.
  4. I’d love to see more East and North African SFF being published. I suspect there’s a hotbed of potential and talent in Kenya, Ethiopia, Algeria, Egypt, Somalia… and many others, that I just don’t get to see. Maybe I’m not yet clued in on the circles. Anyone with information and links to books and magazines from those regions in general, please let me know.
  5. There are several stories published in 2016 that are on my radar and I suspect I will really like as well based on their descriptions. But just haven’t gotten a chance to read them yet. I’m sure I will, eventually. But if you can, check out:
  • The Apologists” by Tade Thompson, Interzone (Science Fiction)
  • Omoshango” by Dayo Ntwari, Lightspeed: People of Colo(u)r Destroy Science Fiction Special Issue(Science Fiction)
  • When The Trees Were Enchanted” by Masimba Musodza,Winter Tales (Fantasy)

And let me know?

UPDATE (20/12/2016): I have now read “The Apologists” by Tade Thompson and I loved it. While it doesn’t particularly focus on Africa or African characters, it has a brilliant premise and a great protagonist. I wrote a review HERE.

  1. Near misses – stories that I have read and enjoyed and that could easily have been on the list as well if 10 wasn’t such a convenient number for such lists. Check them out too.
  1. If there is an African spec story published in 2016 which you thought was spectacular and you don’t see on this list, then check this one. And if you still don’t see it there, then please let me know by filling this form or commenting below.

That’s it for now.

Live long and prosper.